Best type of wood and supplier for first ever violin

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Best type of wood and supplier for first ever violin

Postby Zinguri » Fri Jun 21, 2013 11:53 am

Hello, thanks for this wonderful site. Can someone recommend a good supplier for adequate but economic wood for the first ever violin? Probably it does not make sense to spend a fortune whilst learning the very basic stuff. Thanks!
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Re: Best type of wood and supplier for first ever violin

Postby Vojtech Blahout » Fri Jun 21, 2013 3:08 pm

Hello Zinguri and welcome to the site!

You don't have to spend a fortune, but you should get decent wood, well quartered, within parameters, because you'll spend at least a month /more likely a couple/ building the instrument. Also, your location may be an important factor, because of postage fees and import duties. For an example, check out https://www.tonewood.sk/ The prices for spruce start at 35 Euros and 80 Euros for maple. These are their "boutique" prices. You may be able to find better deals elsewhere on their site. I have personally never bought from them but they are generally considered a reliable supplier, which is another factor, when you may need to pay them in advance.

Or google for the violin maker nearest you, pay them a visit, explain. You may get the appropriate wood for the best price this way. Maybe even free.

Hope this helps, Vojtech Blahout
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Re: Best type of wood and supplier for first ever violin

Postby NCSawdust » Sun Nov 22, 2015 4:18 pm

Might I recommend Simeon Chambers in the US @ http://simeonchamberstonewood.com ?

This man knows his wood, and he only sells what is well suited to instrument building (meaning, air dried, perfectly split/sawn, top-grade, etc.). I've bought a range of top "grades" from him - from low to high and to be honest even the low grades (what he calls 'utility') are very nice and an incredible value at only $15 per! I will say his top grades are stunning, with a uniformity of colour and texture which makes it almost difficult to believe it was once a tree in a forest. (Quite a bit more expensive though at $40 to $75 each.) Don't forget corner blocks, bass bars, etc. while you're there.

Hopefully shipping outside the US won't be too costly.

Regards,
J
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Re: Best type of wood and supplier for first ever violin

Postby phantompepper » Sat Sep 10, 2016 5:31 am

Better act fast! Simeon Chambers is going out of business and is offering up to 50% off. He's hoping to get rid of all his inventory by the end of the year.

http://www.simeonchamberstonewood.com
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Re: Best type of wood and supplier for first ever violin

Postby Blackmon » Fri Aug 11, 2017 9:29 am

phantomepepper wrote:Better act fast! Simeon Chambers is going out of business and is offering up to 50% off. He's hoping to try phenq to get rid of all his inventory by the end of the year.


Any more good suppliers?
Last edited by Blackmon on Fri Mar 23, 2018 8:13 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Best type of wood and supplier for first ever violin

Postby RickM » Thu Sep 14, 2017 3:31 am

In Canada, Lemuel violins (violins.ca) is good. There are several other, but Lemuel carries European as well as Canadian.
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Re: Best type of wood and supplier for first ever violin

Postby Elamah » Fri Nov 30, 2018 8:45 am

I think rosewood generally looks best too, but CARVED fittings look great-


that's not a soundpost- it's an endpin

shaping and fitting pegs can be difficult and lead to problems- so I personally have been reluctant to make changes solely for appearance sake on my fiddles there-

but if you are used to such things, then go for it-
peg hole reamers and peg shapers are generally encouraged, but you may find some pegs to fit

most pegs are sold as blanks- most run longer then than the final install, and many are not pre-drilled

The end pin is often said to need fitting as well- never replaced one myself- but how hard can it be to get a tapered pin to fit a round tapered hole when it doesn't have tro move otherwise?
I guess the danger is making it too loose- so be carefull about the hole into the body,

Tailpieces are easy to replace- the tailgut screws and unscrews at each end
I personally usually end up taking the chin rest off and not putting it back on- after playing a year I don't know if that will change
but I would like to at least try a shoulder rest, as I'm attempting some crude vibrato more these days.

the fiddlehangout.com is a great source of info, and practice/performance video. I play along to the Jukebox.
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