Revision [5008]

Last edited on 2017-09-13 11:47:49 by Vojtech Blahout
Additions:
~1) Measure the basics: **Neck stop** {**130 mm**} **Fig. 4**, **elevation** {**27 mm**} **Fig. 5**, **overstand** /neck step/ {**6 mm**} **Fig. 6** and the **centering** **Fig. 7**, so that you have some idea from whence to start. The numbers in the curly brackets are your goal towards which you should carefully proceed. --- ---The elevation is connected to the arching. Thicker tops can have slightly {tens of a mm} more elevation, which causes the sound to be more powerful. --- ---The overstand is connected to elevation. It should be around **6 mm**. On less arched tops it can be slightly less. Always make sure the fingerboard gets a clearing of at least **2.5 mm** from where the top's arch is nearest to it. --- ---As for centering, it is good to make the mark mentioned above, at the top of the mortice. Make yet another at the end of the fingerboard so that you can compare it to the centerline running beneath it in the top plate. These should be perfectly aligned. This is by no means a substitution for bridge checks, which are the final check of centering.
~1) The final thickness of the neck is **20.5 mm** towards the neck root and **18.5 mm** towards the heel so make sure it is close to these numbers. These are general numbers which may need to be changed based on the size of the player's hand.
Deletions:
~1) Measure the basics: **Neck stop** {**130 mm**} **Fig. 4**, **elevation** {**27 mm**} **Fig. 5**, **overstand** /neck step/ {**6 mm**} **Fig. 6** and the **centering** **Fig. 7**, so that you have some idea from whence to start. The numbers in the curly brackets are your goal towards which you should carefully proceed. --- ---The elevation is connected to the arching. Thicker tops can have slightly {tens of a mm} more elevation because it causes the sound to be more powerful. --- ---The overstand is connected to elevation. It should be around **6 mm**. On less arched tops it can be slightly less. Always make sure the fingerboard gets a clearing of at least **2.5 mm** from where the top's arch is nearer to it. --- ---As for centering, it is good to make the mark mentioned above, at the top of the mortice. Make yet another at the end of the fingerboard so that you can compare it to the centerline running beneath it in the top plate. These should be perfectly aligned. This is by no means a substitution for bridge checks, which are the final check of centering.
~1) The final thickness of the neck is **20.5 mm** towards the neck root and **18.5 mm** towards the heel so make sure it is close to these numbers. Of course these are general numbers which may need to be changed based on the size of the player's hand.


Revision [4920]

Edited on 2016-03-16 10:10:44 by Vojtech Blahout
Additions:
~1) When the side profile of the neck is perfect, turn the violin around its axis to see the other surfaces of the oval underside and remove anything odd with a flat file.
Deletions:
~1) When the side profile of the neck is perfect, turn the violin along its axis to see the other surfaces of the oval underside and remove anything odd.


Revision [4911]

Edited on 2016-03-10 15:13:55 by Vojtech Blahout
Additions:
~1) Measure the basics: **Neck stop** {**130 mm**} **Fig. 4**, **elevation** {**27 mm**} **Fig. 5**, **overstand** /neck step/ {**6 mm**} **Fig. 6** and the **centering** **Fig. 7**, so that you have some idea from whence to start. The numbers in the curly brackets are your goal towards which you should carefully proceed. --- ---The elevation is connected to the arching. Thicker tops can have slightly {tens of a mm} more elevation because it causes the sound to be more powerful. --- ---The overstand is connected to elevation. It should be around **6 mm**. On less arched tops it can be slightly less. Always make sure the fingerboard gets a clearing of at least **2.5 mm** from where the top's arch is nearer to it. --- ---As for centering, it is good to make the mark mentioned above, at the top of the mortice. Make yet another at the end of the fingerboard so that you can compare it to the centerline running beneath it in the top plate. These should be perfectly aligned. This is by no means a substitution for bridge checks, which are the final check of centering.
Deletions:
~1) Measure the basics: **Neck stop** {**130 mm**} **Fig. 4**, **elevation** {**27 mm**} **Fig. 5**, **overstand** /neck step/ {**6 mm**} **Fig. 6** and the **centering** **Fig. 7**, so that you have some idea from whence to start. The numbers in the curly brackets are your goal towards which you should carefully proceed. --- ---The elevation is connected to the arching. Thicker tops can have slightly {tens of mm} more elevation because it causes the sound to be more powerful. --- ---The overstand is connected to elevation. It should be around **6 mm**. On less arched tops it can be slightly less. Always make sure the fingerboard gets a clearing of at least **2.5 mm** from where the top's arch is nearer to it. --- ---As for centering, it is good to make the mark mentioned above, at the top of the mortice. Make yet another at the end of the fingerboard so that you can compare it to the centerline running beneath it in the top plate. These should be perfectly aligned. This is by no means a substitution for bridge checks, which are the final check of centering.


Revision [4910]

Edited on 2016-03-10 15:11:05 by Vojtech Blahout
Additions:
~1) Measure the basics: **Neck stop** {**130 mm**} **Fig. 4**, **elevation** {**27 mm**} **Fig. 5**, **overstand** /neck step/ {**6 mm**} **Fig. 6** and the **centering** **Fig. 7**, so that you have some idea from whence to start. The numbers in the curly brackets are your goal towards which you should carefully proceed. --- ---The elevation is connected to the arching. Thicker tops can have slightly {tens of mm} more elevation because it causes the sound to be more powerful. --- ---The overstand is connected to elevation. It should be around **6 mm**. On less arched tops it can be slightly less. Always make sure the fingerboard gets a clearing of at least **2.5 mm** from where the top's arch is nearer to it. --- ---As for centering, it is good to make the mark mentioned above, at the top of the mortice. Make yet another at the end of the fingerboard so that you can compare it to the centerline running beneath it in the top plate. These should be perfectly aligned. This is by no means a substitution for bridge checks, which are the final check of centering.
Deletions:
~1) Measure the basics: **Neck stop** {**130 mm**} **Fig. 4**, **elevation** {**27 mm**} **Fig. 5**, **overstand** /neck step/ {**6 mm**} **Fig. 6** and the **centering** **Fig. 7**, so that you have some idea from whence you start. The numbers in the curly brackets are your goal towards which you will slowly proceed. --- ---The elevation is connected to the arching. Thicker tops can have slightly {tens of mm} more elevation because it causes the sound to be more powerful. --- ---The overstand is connected to elevation. It should be around **6 mm**. On less arched tops it can be slightly less. Always make sure the fingerboard gets a clearing of at least **2.5 mm** from where the top's arch is nearer to it. --- ---As for centering, it is good to make the mark mentioned above, at the top of the mortice. Make yet another at the end of the fingerboard so that you can compare it to the centerline running beneath it in the top plate. These should be perfectly aligned. This is by no means a substitution for bridge checks, which are the final check of centering.


Revision [4909]

Edited on 2016-03-03 12:22:02 by Vojtech Blahout
Additions:
a) 2:3 ratio between neck stop length and body stop length.
~1) Measure the height of the ribs, **30 mm** in our case, and make the mark **"d"** /29 mm in our case/.
~1) Measure the thickness of the bottom plate, and make the mark **"e"**.
~1) Finally, **2 mm** from the **"e"** mark is the place to measure the second width, **"f"** /18 mm in our case/.
With the widths **"c"** and **"f"** measured, you can proceed to the violin body to make the neck mortice.
~1) With your sharp knife make two incisions on these marks, cutting through the thickness of the top plate, through the purfling, to the depth of about **4.5-5 mm**. The knife should be a little tilted, copying the directions of the neck root walls, see the two red dashed lines in **Fig. 3.** to get an idea.
Deletions:
a) 2:3 ratio between neck stop and body stop lengths.
~1) Measure the height of the ribs, **30 mm** in our case, **"d"**.
~1) Measure the thickness of the bottom plate **"e"**.
~1) Finally, **2 mm** from the **"e"** mark is the place to measure the second width, **"f"**.
With this marked out, you can proceed to transfer the widths to the violin body.
~1) Using a Vernier caliper, measure the widths of the neck root at the positions **c** and **f**, as depicted in **Fig. 1**. In our case, these are **28.3 mm** and **17 mm** respectively.
~1) With your sharp knife make two incisions on these previously made marks, cutting through the thickness of the top plate, through the purfling, to the depth of about **4.5-5 mm**. The knife should be a little tilted, copying the directions of the neck root walls, see the two red dashed lines in **Fig. 3.** to get an idea.


Revision [4865]

The oldest known version of this page was created on 2016-02-16 09:41:31 by Vojtech Blahout